William Carey Richards

(London, England, 24 November 1818 - 17 May 1892, Chicago, Ill.

His father removed to this country in 1831, and the son was graduated at Madison university in 1840. He then went to the south, and for ten years was engaged in educational and literary work in Georgia. In 1849, he removed to Charleston, South Carolina, where he resided for two years. During his life in the south he edited the Orion magazine and The Schoolfellow. The Knickerbocker magazine (New York) may have furnished the model of William C. Richards in his "Editor's Table" in the Orion (Penfield) and the Southern Literary Gazette (Athens).

In 1852, he returned to the north, and soon afterward entered the ministry. In 1855, he became associate pastor of the 1st Baptist church in Providence, Rhode Island From 1855 till 1862, he was pastor of the Brown street Baptist church in the same city, and he subsequently ministered to churches in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in 1865-1869, and Chicago, Illinois, 1876-1877. For twenty-five years he has given public lectures in the United States and Canada on the popular aspects of physical science, illustrated by an extensive apparatus. He has received the honorary degree of Ph.D. Professor Richards has contributed frequently to magazines, and is the author of several college and anniversary poems. His principal works are:
"Shakespeare Calendar" (New York, 1850);
"The claims of science" (1851);
"Harry's Vacation, or Philosophy at Home" (1854);
"Electron" (1858);
"Science in Song" (1865);
"Great in Goodness, a Memoir of George N. Briggs, Governor of Massachusetts" (Boston, 1866);
"Thanksgiving for peace" (1866);
"Retrorsum": a poem delivered before the alumni of Madison university (1869);
"Baptist Banquets" (Chicago, 1881);
"The Lord is My Shepherd" (1884);
"The Mountain Anthem" (1885); and
"Our Father in Heaven" (Boston, 1886).

-- His wife. Cornelia Holroyd (Bradley), author, born in Hudson, New York, 1 November, 1822, after graduation at New Hampton literary and theological institute, married Dr. Richards on 21 September, 1841. She has written under the pen-name of "Mrs. Manners," and is the author of:
"At Home and Abroad, or How to Behave" (New York, 1853);
"Pleasure and Profit, or Lessons on the Lord's Prayer" (1853);
"Aspiration, an Autobiography" (1856);
"Sedgemoor, or Home Lessons" (1857);
"Hester and I, or Beware of Worldliness" (1860);
"Springs of Adion" (1863); and
"Cousin Alice," a memoir of her sister, Alice B. Haven (1871).

-- His brother, Thomas Addison, artist, born in London, England, 3 December, 1820, came to the United States at the age of eleven, and from 1835 till 1845, resided in Georgia. Thence he went to New York, where for the next two years he was a pupil at the National academy. He was elected an associate of the academy in 1848, and an academician in 1851. In 1852, he became its corresponding secretary, which post he still (1888) holds. In 1858-1860, he was director of the Cooper Union School of Design for Women, being the first to fill the office. Since 1867, he has been professor of art in the University of the city of New York, which gave him the honorary degree of M. A. in 1878. He has resided in New York since 1845, but has travelled much, both at home and abroad. Thomas Addison's numerous paintings include:
"Alastor, or the Spirit of Solitude," and
"The Indian's Paradise -- a Dream of the Happy Hunting Ground" (1854);
"lave Oaks of the South" (1858);
"The French Broad River, North Carolina" (1859);
"Sunnyside" (1862);
"The River Rhine" and
"Warwick Castle" (1869);
"Chatsworth, England" (1870);
"Lake Than, Switzerland" (1871);
"Italian Lake Scene" (1873);
"Lake in the Adirondacks" (1875);
"Lake Winnipiseogee" (1876);
"Lake Brienz, Switzerland" (1879); and
"The Edisto River, South Carolina" (1886).

He is also well known as an author and illustrator of books, and has published:
The American Artist (Baltimore, 1838);
Georgia Illustrated (Augusta, 1842);
The Romance of American Landscape (1854);
Summer Stories of the South (Charleston, South Carolina, 1852); and
Pictures and Painters (London, 1870).
Appletons' Handbooks of Travel.
For most of these he furnished both text and illustrations.

Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, edited by James Grant Wilson, John Fiske and Stanley L. Klos. Six volumes, New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1887-1889.



As a magazine editor, as an author of articles, essays, pamphlets, poems, books, and sermons, and as a minister of the gospel, William Carey Richards made significant contributions to the cultural development of the United States during the nineteenth century. More particularly, he helped develop the literary magazine movement in the South with the Orion and the Southern Literary Gazette, and he provided an early educational magazine for children, the Schoolfellow.

Richards was born in London on 24 November 1818, the son of William Richards, a Baptist minister, and Anne Gardener Richards. He was named in part after William Carey, one of the first Baptist missionaries from England to go to India. The family immigrated to the United States in 1831, and Richards's father became minister of a church in Hudson, New York. Within a few years the family relocated in Penfield, Georgia.



William Carey Richards, author, was born in London, England, November 24, 1818; son of the Rev. William Richards, who immigrated to the United States with his family in 1831, and became pastor of the Baptist church in Hudson, N.Y. William, who was a brother of Thomas Addison Richards (q.v.), was graduated at Hamilton Institution (Colgate university) in 1840; and was married, Sept. 21, 1841, to Cornelia Holroyd, daughter of George and Sarah (Brown) Bradley of Hudson, N.Y. He engaged in literary and educational work in Georgia, 1840-1849, and in Charleston, S.C., 1849-1851; edited the Orion and The Schoolfellow, and was associated with the Southern Quarterly Magazine. He became associate pastor of the First Baptist church at Providence, R.I., in 1855; was ordained in July, 1855; was pastor of the Brown Street Baptist church in Providence, R.I., 1855-1862, and engaged in lecturing on physical science, 1862-1865. He was pastor of the Baptist church in Pittsfield, Mass., 1865-1868; professor of chemistry in the Berkshire Medical college for two years, and pastor at Chicago, Ill., 1876-1877, resuming his scientific lecture work in 1877. He received the degree Ph.D. from Madison (Colgate) university in 1869. He was associated in the editorship of the Chicago Standard, 1876-1880, contributed frequently to magazines, and is the author of:
Shakespeare Calendar (1850)
Harry's Vacation, or Philosophy at Home (1854)
Electron (1858)
Science in Song (1865)
Great in Goodness, a Memoir of George N. Briggs, Governor of Massachusetts (1866)
Baptist Banquets (1881)
The Lord is My Shepherd (1884)
The Mountain Anthem (1885)
Our Father in Heaven (1886), and college and anniversary.

The Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, (Boston: The Biographical Society, 1904).


Harry's Vacation, serialized in Schoolfellow as: Editor, Schoolfellow, Your Schoolfellow; W. C. R.; W. C. Richards, Wm. C. Richards


William Carey Richards, author, born in London, England, 24 November, 1818. His father removed to this country in 1831, and the son was graduated at Madison university in 1840. He then went to the south, and for ten years was engaged in educational and literary work in Georgia. In 1849, he removed to Charleston, S. C, where he resided for two years. During his life in the south he edited the Orion magazine and The Schoolfellow. In 1852, he returned to the north, and soon afterward entered the ministry. In 1855 he became associate pastor of the First Baptist church in Providence, R. I. From 1855 till 1862, he was pastor of the Brown street Baptist church in the same city, and he subsequently ministered to churches in Pittsfield, Mass., in 1865-1869, and Chicago, Ill., 1876-1877. For twenty-five years he has given public lectures in the United States and Canada on the popular aspects of physical science, illustrated by an extensive apparatus. He has received the honorary degree of Ph. D. Prof. Richards has contributed frequently to magazines, and is the author of several college and anniversary poems. His principal works are "Shakespeare Calendar" (New York, 1850); "Harrv's Vacation, or Philosophy at Home" (1854); "Electron" (1858); "Science in Song" (1865); "Great in Goodness, a Memoir of George N. Briggs, Governor of Massachusetts" (Boston, 1866); "Baptist Banquets" (Chicago, 1881); "The Lord is My Shepherd" (1884); "The Mountain Anthem" (1885); and "Our Father in Heaven" (Boston, 1886).

— His wife, Cornelia Holroyd (Bradley), author, born in Hudson, N. Y., 1 November, 1822, after graduation at New Hampton literary and theological institute, married Dr. Richards on 21 September, 1841. She has written under the pen-name of "Mrs. Manners," and is the author of "At Home and Abroad, or How to Behave" (New York, 1853); "Pleasure and Profit, or Lessons on the Lord's Prayer" (1853); "Aspiration, an Autobiography" (1856); "Sedgemoor, or Home Lessons" (1857); "Hester and I, or Beware of Worldliness" (1860); "Springs of Adion" (1863); and "Cousin Alice," a memoir of her sister, Alice B. Haven (1871).

— His brother, Thomas Addison, artist, born in London, England, 3 December, 1820, came to the United States at the age of eleven, and from 1835 till 1845, resided in Georgia. Thence he went to New York, where for the next two years he was a pupil at the National academy. He was elected an associate of the academy in 1848, and an academician in 1851. In 1852, he became its corresponding secretary, which post he still (1888) holds. In 1858-1860 he was director of the Cooper union school of design for women, being the first to fill the office. Since 1867, he has been professor of art in the University of the city of New York, which gave him the honorary degree of M. A. in 1878. He has resided in New York since 1845, but has travelled much, both at home and abroad. His numerous paintings include:
"Alastor, or the Spirit of Solitude" and
"The Indian's Paradise -- a Dream of the Happy Hunting Ground" (1854)
"Live Oaks of the South" (1858)
"The French Broad River, N. C." (1859)
"Sunnyside" (1862)
"The River Rhine" and
"Warwick Castle" (1869)
"Chatsworth, England" (1870)
"Lake Thun, Switzerland" (1871)
"Italian Lake Scene" (1873)
"Lake in the Adirondacks" (1875)
"Lake Winnipiseogee" (1876)
"Lake Brienz, Switzerland" (1879) and
"The Edisto River, S. C." (1886).

He is also well known as an author and illustrator of books, and has published The American Artist (Baltimore, 1838); Georgia Illustrated (Augusta, 1842); The Romance of American Landscape (1854); Summer Stories of the South (Charleston, S. C., 1852); and Pictures and Painters (London, 1870). For most of these he furnished both text and illustrations. He was also engaged on Appletons' Handbooks of Travel.

Appletons' cyclopædia of American biography 1888


External Links:
William Carey Richards [list of writings and books.]
Virtual American Biographies
Contributors to Schoolfellow Magazine



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