Louis Lang

(29 February 1812* or 1814-1893)





He was born in Waldsee, Duchy of Württemberg. His father, a historical painter, wished him to become a musician, but his taste was for art. At the age of 16, he executed pastels with success. He studied at Stuttgart and Paris, and settled in the United States in 1838, his studio being for several years in Philadelphia. He spent the years 1841 to 1845, in Italy, and moved to New York City in 1845, where he resided, with frequent visits to Europe. He was elected a National Academician in 1852, and was a member of the Artists' Fund Society. Lang's style was characterized by brilliant but well-balanced coloring.

Cyclopædia of American Biography lists birth date 29 February 1812. Calendar for February, *1812, is a leap year, while February, 1814 only has 28 days.

Among his works are:
Maid of Saragossa Mary Stuart distributing Gifts
Blind Nydia Jephtha's Daughter
Neapolitan Fisher Family Mary, Queen of Scots
Cinderella Return of the 69th (Irish) Regiment
Asleep in Prayer (1869) Little Graziosa among the Butterflies (1871)
Landing of the Market-Boat at Capri (1876) Romeo and Juliet
Portrait of a Little Child (1885)






His father, a historical painter, wished him to become a musician, but his taste was for art. At the age of sixteen he executed pastels with success. He studied at Stuttgart and Paris, and settled in the United States in 1838, his studio being for several years in Philadelphia. He spent the years 1841-45 in Italy, and came to New York in the latter year, where he now (1887) resides, with frequent visits to Europe. He was elected a National academician in 1852, and is a member of the Artists' fund society. Lang's style is characterized by brilliant but well-balanced coloring; his choice of subjects is sentimental and popular.

Cyclopædia of American Biography, Christopher Langdell, Edition of 1892.





"Nothing to Wear," Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 1863

Butler, in his poem of "Nothing to Wear," made one of those hits which become immortal in literature. The inconsistency of a phrase so constantly heard in an age of extravagance, almost unexampled in history, give a point to the conventional miseries of Miss Flora McFlimsey, that drew laughter from all, even from the thousand copies of the great prototype. Few of our readers can fail to remember among the artistic beauties that covered the walls of the National Academy of Design, at its last exhibition, a charming "Nothing to Wear," from the pencil of Louis Lang. A painter of merit, and rapidly rising in the public esteem, he needs but time to assume a high rank among the artists of America. We present our readers with a copy of the beautiful piece to which we have alluded.

The figure of Miss Flora McFlimsey, amid the luxury of her boudoir, where all breathes of wealth, ancestral pride, and voluptuous ease, is charmingly conceived, and the chagrin on her fair brow, as gazing on her rich dress she is forced to confess that she has nothing to wear, is such a picture of real sorrow, that properly understood and appreciated, as it will doubtless be by our readers, it must move the sympathetic even to tears.

© Copyright Ownership: assumption.edu -- Lang, Nothing to Wear

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