Robert Ladbrooke

(1769 - 11 Oct 1842)

Robert Ladbrooke; landscape and portrait painter, father of artists Henry, John Berney and Frederick Ladbrooke.

LADBROOKE, ROBERT (1768–1842), landscape-painter, born in a humble position at Norwich in 1768 [9?], was apprenticed when very young to an artist and printer named White, and for some years worked as a journeyman printer. While so engaged he made the acquaintance of John Crome [q. v.], then a lad of about his own age, who was working for a house and sign-painter, and having congenial tastes they became fast friends, living together, and devoting all their spare time to sketching and copying. They married, early, two sisters of the name of Berney, and for two years worked in partnership, Ladbrooke painting portraits and Crome landscapes, which they sold for very small sums. Subsequently Ladbrooke also turned to landscape-painting, in which he was highly successful. Crome and Ladbrooke took a leading part in the establishment of the celebrated Norwich Society of Artists in 1803, and to its first exhibition in 1805, the latter contributed fourteen works. In 1808, when Crome became president, Ladbrooke was elected vice-president. In 1816, he, with Stannard, Thirtle, and a few other members, having ineffectually urged a modification of some of the rules, seceded from the society, and started a rival exhibition, but this proved a failure, and was abandoned after three years. Between 1804 and 1815, Ladbrooke was an occasional exhibitor at the Royal Academy, and up to 1822, at the British Institution. He engaged successfully in teaching, and was able to retire with a competence many years before his death. He died at his house on Scoles' Green, Norwich, on 11 Oct. 1842.

Ladbrooke was a clever painter, chiefly of views of Norfolk scenery; but his reputation has never been more than local. He published aquatints of two of his pictures, ‘A View of the Fellmongers on the River near Bishop's Bridge’ and ‘A View of Norwich Castle.’ His ‘Views of the Churches of Norfolk,’ a series of over 650 lithographic plates, were published in five volumes in 1843. Two of Ladbrooke's sons were well-known artists.

[Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 31, by Freeman Marius O'Donoghue; Norwich Mercury, 15 Oct. 1842; Wodderspoon's John Crome and his Works, 1876; Redgrave's Dictionary of Artists; Royal Academy and British Institution Catalogues; Graves's Dictionary of Artists, 1760–1880; Times, 29 July 1879.]



English painter and printmaker, one of the founders of the Norwich School with Crome; active in Norwich. He was apprenticed to a painter, printer and engraver called White. In 1792, he witnessed John Crome’s marriage to Phoebe Berney, and on 3 October 1793, he himself married his first wife, Mary Berney, Phoebe’s sister. A full evaluation of his work is hampered by a lack of surviving recognized examples. Four of his views of Norwich, one dated 1806, were aquatinted by Samuel Alken.

Robert Ladbrooke, St Andrew’s, Norwich until 1829,
White Lion St 1829-1839 or later,
College St, Bury St Edmunds 1841,
11 White Lion St, Norwich by 1845-1852.
Carver and gilder, picture cleaner, drawing master.

He advertised his removal from his residence in St Andrew’s, Norwich, to White Lion St on 31 January 1829. In the 1841, census he was listed in Bury St Edmunds and in 1851, in Norwich as a carver and gilder, age 51, with a son Robert, age 17, also a carver and gilder. In his will, made 24 March 1851, and proved 9 September 1852, Robert Ladbrooke junr, carver and gilder, describes himself as formerly of Bury St Edmunds, now of White Lion St, refering to his wife Elizabeth and leaving his stock-in-trade and tools to his son Robert.

Ladbrooke’s trade label from White Lion St, with text set within an image of a heavy swept frame with prominent corners, describes him as ‘Carver, Gilder, Picture, and Lookingglass, Frame Maker’. Another trade label, but as R. Ladbrooke junr, within a classical Greek Key surround, describes him (or his son) as ‘Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame Maker’, advertising ‘Frames regilt. Old Paintings repaired, Cleaned and Varnis.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Robert Ladbrooke Senr. (b Norwich, 1769; d Norwich, 11 Oct 1842).
English painter and printmaker. He was apprenticed to a painter, printer and engraver called White. In 1792, he witnessed John Crome's marriage to Phoebe Berney, and on 3 October 1793, he himself married his first wife, Mary Berney (d 1807), Phoebe's sister. A full evaluation of his work is hampered by a lack of surviving recognized examples. Four of his views of Norwich, one dated 1806, were aquatinted by Samuel Alken.

answers.com

Alternate Name Forms:
Richard Ladbroke‏
Richard Ladbrook‏
Richard Ladbrooke‏
Robert Ladbrooke


Ladbrooke's association with John Crome:
About the age of 12, he formed a friendship with Robert Ladbrooke, an apprentice printer, who became a celebrated landscape painter. The pair shared a room and went on sketching trips in the fields and lanes around Norwich. They occasionally bought art prints to copy. Crome and Ladbrooke sold some of their art work to a local print-seller, "Smith and Jaggers" of Norwich. It was probably through the print-seller that John Crome met, Thomas Harvey of Old Catton, who helped him set up as a drawing teacher. He had access to Harvey's art collection which allowed him to hone his skills by copying the works of Gainsborough and Hobbemas. In October 1792, Crome married Phoebe Berney - they had two daughters and six sons. His eldest son, John Berney Crome (1794-1842) was a landscape painter of note, as was his third son William Henry Crome (1806-67).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

LADBROOKE, Robert – 1769-1842. Co-founder of the Norwich School. He exhibited a number of Norfolk coastal views at the Norwich Society of Artists including ‘View from Lowestoft’ (1804), ‘View of Mundesley’ (1806), ‘View of Yarmouth Jetty’ (1806) and ‘Mackeral market on the beach at Yarmouth’ (1810).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ROBERT LADBROOKE (Norwich School) 1769-1812 "A LANDSCAPE WITH TREES" -- Beside the bed of a shallow stream which skirts a dilapidated fence grow several old trees, their heavy foliage massed against the summer sky. Beneath their lower branches can be seen the gleam of a large body of water, and in the distance the curving lines of a range of low hills covered with trees. Height, 34 inches; width, 28 inches.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ROBERT LADBROOKE (Norwich School) 1769-1842 "THE THATCHED FARMHOUSE" -- In a natural depression in a sandy heath stands an old farmhouse, beneath the shade of a number of fine trees, the thatched roof and tiny windows giving it an appearance of considerable antiquity. A flock of sheep is being driven along a road, which leads apparently to a group of outbuildings on the right of the picture. In the foreground is the trunk of a large tree, and in the distance can be seen dense woods. The sky is covered with heavy clouds which appear to presage rain. Height, 23 inches; length, 30 inches.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Robert Ladbrook may have been drawn to painting thourgh his friendship with John Crome. The two worked together and Crome, who was older, certainly had a considerable influence on his talented younger friend. The two men married each other's sisters. In 1803, they were the real force in founding the Norwich Society of Artists, whose ame was to interpret nature in a new, realistic, romantic way. In 1816, Ladbrook fell out with his brother-in-law and set up a rival art society; however, the men reconciled two years later. Ladbrook began his career in portraits which he executed in pencil and sold at five shillings each. His great strength, however, lay in the depictions of the Norfolk coast and in country scenes. In 1845, an important series of prints entitled Views of the Churches of Norfolk Drawn and Lithographed by Robert Ladbrook, was published in five volumes. He exhibited in London from 1810 to 1822, at the British Institution and the Suffolk Street Gallery.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Another young artist began at the same time with Old Crome -- Robert Ladbrooke: he and Crome married two Sisters, and commenced in partnership as teachers of drawing. Crome was fond of company, a dashing fellow, with great ideas; his brother-in-law was plodding, prudent, and took care of what cash came in his way; taught his family to be so, and acquired a competency for his old days. Ladbrooke never achieved. much renown; his style was not attractive, but by painting and teaching he saved money.



Ladbrook Family of Painters

Robert Ladbrooke Jnr. (1798-1852)

One of four sons of the artist of the same name, Robert Ladbrooke (1769-1842), the other three also becoming artists, including Henry (1800-69) and John Berney (1803-79). He advertised his removal from his residence in St Andrew’s, Norwich, to White Lion St on 31 January 1829, (Norwich Mercury). In the 1841, census he was listed in Bury St Edmunds and in 1851, in Norwich as a carver and gilder, age 51, with a son Robert, age 17, also a carver and gilder. In his will, made 24 March 1851, and proved 9 September 1852, Robert Ladbrooke Jnr., carver and gilder, describes himself as formerly of Bury St Edmunds, now of White Lion St, refering (sic) to his wife Elizabeth and leaving his stock-in-trade and tools to his son Robert.

Ladbrooke’s trade label from White Lion St, with text set within an image of a heavy swept frame with prominent corners, describes him as ‘Carver, Gilder, Picture, and Looking-glass, Frame Maker’ (National Portrait Gallery, Thomas Lawrence’s Sarah Trimmer, an early reframing). Another trade label, but as R. Ladbrooke junr, within a classical Greek Key surround, describes him (or his son) as ‘Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame Maker’, advertising ‘Frames regilt. Old Paintings repaired, Cleaned and Varnished’.



Henry Ladbrooke (1800-69)

Painted more after the manner of his uncle Crome -- his colour quiet, and often of good quality. He appreciated the scenes he depicted. He (the speaker) had travelled a good deal with him, was a very intelligent man, talked well about art, and his anecdotes of the artists of the olden time were very entertaining. He has been dead many years.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ladbrooke, Henry (1800–1870), the second son, was born at Norwich on 20 April 1800. He wished to enter the church, but at his father's desire adopted landscape-painting as a profession. He acquired some reputation, especially for his moonlight scenes, and exhibited occasionally at the British Institution and the Suffolk Street Gallery. He died on 18 Nov. 1870.



John Berney (b. 31 October 1803 - d. 1879)

John Berney Ladbrooke was the third son of Robert Ladbrooke; he studied under his father and his uncle, John Crome.

The son of the English painter and printmaker Robert Ladbrooke (1768-1842), John Berney Ladbrooke is well known for his views of the English landscape. He was apprenticed to John Crome (1768-1821) and became a significant member of the Norwich School. He exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1821-1822, and at the British Institution and the Suffolk Street Gallery up to 1873. Ladbrooke was a successful teacher, numbering John Middleton (1828-1856) among his pupils. His oils display a High Victorian attention to detail and rather bombastic lighting effects. Artworks in the following collections: Norwich Castle Museum, Norfolk, UK; Bolton Museum, Lancashire, UK.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

John Berney Ladbrooke, a landscape painter and lithographer. He was a British visual artist who was born in 1803. The son of the English painter and printmaker Robert Ladbrooke (1769-1842). John Berney Ladbrooke is well known for his views of the English landscape. Numerous works by the artist have been sold at auction, including 'The water frolic on the river Bure at Wroxham, Norfolk' sold at Sotheby's London.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ladbrooke was the third son of the celebrated Norfolk landscape artist, Robert Ladbrooke (1769-1842). He studied under both his father and his uncle, the artist John Crome, both of whom were instrumental in founding the Norwich Society of Artists in 1803. Ladbrooke predominately painted landscapes, excelling in his rendition of oak, as can be seen in "A wooded landscape with figures resting on a track" where two large oaks flank the middle-ground. In 1817 he began to exhibit at the Norwich Society of Artists and his work was seen at the Royal academy, the British Institution and at the Suffolk Street Gallery from 1821 to 1872.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ladbrooke, John Berney, British, 19th century, male. Born 31 October 1803, in Norwich; died 11 July 1879, in Norwich. Painter, lithographer. Landscapes with figures, landscapes, animals. School of Norwich. John Berney Ladbrooke was the third son of Robert Ladbrooke; he studied under his father and his uncle, John Crome. He painted landscapes, excelling in his rendition of oak trees. He also taught. He began to exhibit at the Norwich Society of Artists in 1817, and his work was seen at the Royal Academy, the British Institution, and at the Suffolk Street Gallery from 1821 to 1872.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

One of the last survivors of what is now distinguished us the "Norwich school" of painting, John Berney Ladbrooke, died on July 11. He was the third son of Robert Ladbrooke, the early friend, and afterwards the brother-in-law, of "Old" Crome, with whom at one time he set up a sort of artistic partnership. In later life these two were unfortunately divided, each heading opposed societies of art in Norwich; but the son of Ladbrooke, who was named John Berney, like his cousin John Berney Crome, apparently owed more to the teaching of his uncle than to that of his father. His pictures have all the characteristics of Crome's style, and are especially noticeable for the excellent painting of foliage. He seems always to have received good prices for his works, though they were not often seen at exhibitions. He and his brothers, however, have exhibited at times at the Royal Academy, though not of late years, and the Norwich Mercury records that a small picture by him was purchased at a sale in Paris by Baron Rothschild. His reputation, therefore, must have been moro extended than that of his father and uncle.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

John Berney Ladbrooke, a bustling little man, taught drawmg and painted for sale, built a nice little house on Mousehold, with Kett’s Castle in his grounds. His pictures fetched large sums. His works, he thought, would not be considered to be of high order of merit. Some of his pictures of oak trees are well-done, and his pictures are pretty, but from continual painting in his studio they are mannered, and have not the quality of nature to be observed in those of the Cromes, the Starks, and Cotmans. His foliage is flat; he does not understand light and shade; they want air and perspective, and are rarely enlivened with figures. He prospered, and deserved it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ladbrooke, John Berney (1803-1879), Robert Ladbrooke's third son, was born in 1803. He became a pupil of John Crome (his uncle by marriage), whose manner he followed, and excelled in the representation of woodland scenery. He exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1821 and 1822, and frequently at the British Institution and the Suffolk Street Gallery up to 1873. He died at Mousehold, Norwich, on 11 July 1879.



References and External Links:
© National Portrait Gallery
Library of Congress
Dictionary of National Biography vol13, Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1888), "Crome, John (1768-1821)"
Old English Masters, Timothy Cole, 1902)
Encyclopædia Britannica, 1911
The Norwich School, H. M. Cundall, (London: The Studio, 1920 - illustrated)
John Berney Ladbrooke (British, 1803–1879) [art.net]
Notable paintings by masters of the early English, Dutch, Flemish and French schools, Theron J. Blakeslee, (1908)
Benezit Dictionary of British Graphic Artists and Illustrators, Volume 1
Academy and Literature, Volume 16, 1879
The Architect, Volume 28, Gilbert Wood, 1882
sphinxfineart.com