Samuel Jackson, Snr.

(31 December 1794 - 8 December 1869)

English watercolourist and oil painter who has been called the "father" of the Bristol School of artists. He also contributed a number of drawings of scenes from Bristol, England to the topographical collection of George Weare Braikenridge. The Braikenridge Collection makes Bristol's early 19th century appearance one of the best documented of any English city.

Jackson was born in Bristol. His father was an accountant and later a drysalter. Jackson became a professional artist by 1822, primarily a watercolourist of landscapes. In 1823 Jackson was elected an associate member of the Society of Painters in Watercolours.

Braikenridge commissioned him to produce less than 30 watercolours, but collected many more of Jackson's Bristol scenes. His Bristol watercolours of the mid 1820s were his most highly regarded work, and have been called the most important part of the work of the Bristol School. John Lewis Roget called him "the father of the school".

Jackson was a lifelong friend of Francis Danby, whose influence is present in his watercolours He may have been Danby's pupil. In 1823 he collaborated with Danby and James Johnson in a lithography project.

In 1824, Jackson was one of the organisers of the first exhibition by local artists at the new Bristol Institution. He also seems to have participated from 1832–33, in the revival of the Bristol School's sketching meetings.

In 1832, he was the most eminent artist in the first exhibition of the Bristol Society of Artists, and later he continued to play a large role in that society's successor, the Bristol Academy for the Promotion of Fine Arts.

Jackson may have visited the West Indies in 1827; he exhibited West Indian subjects at the Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1828 and 1831. By the 1830s Jackson was also producing scenes of Devon and Wales, and may have visited Switzerland in 1855 and 1858 to produce watercolours of mountain scenery.

He died on 8 December 1869 at Clifton, Bristol. His son was the landscape and marine painter Samuel Phillips Jackson (1830–94).

[Dictionary of National Biography; Oxford University Press; en.Wikipedia]

Samuel Jackson, the son of a Bristol merchant, was born in that city in 1796 (?) and remained there throughout his life, becoming in middle-age something of an elder statesmen of the arts in the city. He appears to have been a steady anchoring influence in the sketching group, and supplemented his earnings from painting with work as a drawing master. He was involved in the organisation of the first exhibition of the work of Bristol artists at the Bristol Institution in 1824-25, and in 1832 was the most important artist involved in the new Bristol Society of Artists.

Jackson was primarily a watercolour artist although he also worked in oils. His earliest work was his best using clear colour and fluent washes. He also made Romantic sepia wash drawings. He was elected an Associate of the Old Water-Colour Society in 1823, and exhibited several large watercolours of imaginary landscapes there. The Bristol antiquarian G. W. Braikenridge collected his work and commissioned topographical drawings from him in the 1820s. Jackson travelled in Europe later in life, visiting Switzerland in 1853 and 1858. His son, Samuel Phillips Jackson (1830-1904) was also a successful watercolour painter.



Samuel Jackson, a water-colour painter, he was at first placed in the office of his father, a merchant, but having, on account of bad health, made a voyage to the West Indies, besides visiting Scotland and Ireland, he developed a taste for art, and he became a pupil of Francis Danby, A.R.A., who was then living at Bristol. In 1823, he became an Associate Exhibitor of the Water-Colour Society, and contributed landscapes annually up to 1848, when he withdrew from the Society. When between sixty and seventy he made a sketching tour in Switzerland, and on his return executed from the sketches then made some of his best works. In the South Kensington Museum are a 'View Looking Down the Avon,' and 'Llanberis, North Wales.'

Bryan's Dictionary of Painters & Engravers, 1876 - Reprinted, 1894, 1899.

SAMUEL JACKSON (1794–1869), landscape-painter, was born 31 December 1794 at Bristol, where his father was a merchant. He began life in his father's office, but on his death abandoned business in favour of landscape-painting, and became a pupil of Francis Danby [q. v.], who was then residing in Bristol. In 1823 he was elected an associate of the Society of Painters in Water-colours, and during the next twenty-six years contributed forty-six drawings to its exhibitions. All these, with the exception of a few West Indian views, the result of a voyage taken in 1827, for the benefit of his health, illustrated English scenery, which he treated in a pleasing and poetical manner, somewhat resembling that of the two Barrets. In 1833, Jackson was one of the founders of a sketching society at Bristol, to which W. J. Müller, J. Skinner Prout, and other artists who later achieved eminence belonged, and he was always closely identified with the Bristol ‘school.’ In 1848, he withdrew from the Water-colour Society, having failed to obtain election to full membership. In 1855 and 1856 Jackson made tours in Switzerland, after which he painted, almost exclusively, Swiss views in oils, which were sent to the Bristol annual exhibition and sold well. Two drawings by him are in the South Kensington Museum. Jackson died at Clifton, 8 December 1869. By his marriage with Jane Phillips he had a son, Samuel Phillips Jackson, member of the Royal Society of Painters in Water-colours, and three daughters.

[Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 29, by Freeman Marius O'Donoghue; Sister Projects: Wikipedia article; Redgrave's Dictionary of Artists; Roget's History of the Old Water-colour Society, 1891; information from the family.]

Samuel Jackson
English Watercolourist and Oil Painter
Birth: December 31, 1794, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England

Samuel's father was an accountant and later a drysalter. Jackson became a professional artist by 1822, primarily a watercolourist of landscapes. In 1832, he was the most eminent artist in the first exhibition of the Bristol Society of Artists, and later he continued to play a large role in that society's successor, the Bristol Academy for the Promotion of Fine Arts. His son was the landscape and marine painter Samuel Phillips Jackson (1830–94).
Family links:
* -Marriage: Jane Phillips, (b. 1797/8)
Children:
Son: Samuel Phillips Jackson (1830-1894)
Daughter: * -Jane was a pianist and a composer of piano music under the name Jules Sivrai, married Mr. J. L. Roeckel, musical composer
Daughter: * -Mrs Ada Villiers, had been a teacher of singing and was herself well known locally as a vocalist.
Daughter: * -Isabella, now Mrs Wightwick, had been a teacher of flower painting
Death: December 8, 1869, Clifton, Gloucestershire, England
Burial: Arnos Vale Cemetery, Arnos Vale, Bristol Unitary Authority, Bristol, England

(* -Added by Webmaster)
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