James Holland

(October 18, 1799 - December 12, 1870)

#Water-colour painter, was born at Burslem, where his father and other members of his family were employed at the pottery works of William Davenport. He was himself employed at an early age in painting flowers on pottery and porcelain, and came to London in 1819 to practise as a flower-painter, and to give lessons in drawing landscape, architecture, and marine subjects.

He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1824, and in 1830 he visited France and made studies of its architecture. In 1823 he exhibited a picture of ‘London from Blackheath.’ In 1835 he became an associate exhibitor of the (now Royal) Society of Painters in Water-colours, but he left the society in 1843, and joined the (now Royal) Society of British Artists, of which he remained a member till 1848. He rejoined the Water-colour Society in 1856, and was elected a full member two years afterwards. He was much employed in drawing for the illustrated annuals, and for this purpose he visited Venice, Milan, Geneva, and Paris in 1836, and Portugal in 1838. In 1839 he exhibited at the Royal Academy a fine painting of Lisbon. In 1845 he went to Rotterdam, in 1850 to Normandy and North Wales, in 1851 again to Geneva, and in 1857 again to Venice.

In the South Kensington Museum are a series of sketches in Portugal dated 1847, from which it would appear that he visited that country a second time. In the course of his life he exhibited, in addition to his contributions to the Water-colour Society, thirty-two pictures at the Royal Academy, ninety-one at the British Institution, and one hundred and eight at the Society of British Artists.



#English painter of flowers, landscapes, architecture and marine subjects, and book illustrator. He worked in both oils and watercolours and was a member of the Royal Watercolour Society.

Holland was born in Burslem, Staffordshire, where his father and other members of his family were employed at the pottery works of William Davenport in Longport. James was himself employed there, from the age of 12, for 7 years, painting flowers on pottery and porcelain. In 1819, he came to London where he continued to work as a pottery painter, but also gave lessons in drawing landscapes, architecture, and marine subjects.

He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1824 and in 1830 visited France and made studies of its architecture. In 1823 he exhibited a picture of 'London from Blackheath'. In l835 he became an associate exhibitor of The Society of Painters in Water-colours, but he left the society in 1843, and joined the Society of British Artists, of which he remained a member until 1848. He rejoined the Watercolour Society in 1856, and was elected a full member two years later.

Holland did a great deal of drawing for the illustrated annuals of the day, and for this purpose visited Venice, Milan, Geneva, and Paris in 1836, and Portugal in 1837. His paintings of Portugal were published in the book, The Tourist in Portugal. In 1839 he exhibited a painting of Lisbon at the Royal Academy. In 1845 he went to Rotterdam, Portugal again in 1847, in 1850 to Normandy and North Wales, in 1851 again to Geneva, and in 1857 again to Venice.

In the course of his life he exhibited, in addition to his contributions to the Watercolour Society, 32 pictures at the Royal Academy, 91 at the British Institution, and 108 at the Society of British Artists. Though generally classed as a water-colour painter, he was equally skilful in oils. He was one of the finest colourists of the English school, and his pictures, especially those of Venice, though neglected in his lifetime, became much sought after in the years after his death. He appears to have ceased to exhibit in 1857.

One of Holland's pupils was topographical artist Frank Dillon (1823–1909) known especially for his paintings of Egypt.

John Lewis Roget, A history of the 'Old water-colour' society (London, New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1891.)

(b Burslem, Staffs, 18 Oct 1799; d London, 12 Feb 1870). English painter. As a boy he was employed for seven years to paint flowers on pottery in the factory of John Davenport (fl 1793; d 1848) of Longport. In 1819 Holland moved to London, where he continued at first to work as a pottery painter but also undertook watercolours of flowers and natural history subjects, exhibiting his works at the Royal Academy from 1824. After 1828 oil paintings predominated over watercolours in the many pictures that he exhibited at the Royal Academy, the Society of Painters in Water-Colours (of which he was made an associate in 1835), the British Institution and the Society of British Artists. He travelled to Paris in 1831 and subsequently made repeated tours of the Continent. Buildings in European cities now became his favourite subject, and above all, scenes of Venice, which he first visited in 1835; his Venetian views have sometimes been confused with those by Richard Parkes Bonington. In 1837, he was commissioned by the Landscape Annual to make drawings in Portugal, which were engraved in the issue for 1839. He travelled again to Venice in 1845, 1851 and 1857, making sketches en route of the Low Countries, France, Switzerland and Austria. Other subjects favoured by Holland were Blackheath and Greenwich (both London), where he lived from 1830 to 1845. He was renowned for his fluent draughtsmanship and for his brilliant colouring in both oils and watercolours, making liberal use of gouache in the latter. The contents of his studio were auctioned at Christie's, London, on 26 May 1870. answers.com



HOLLAND. James, a landscape painter, was born at Burslem in 1800, and in his boyhood painted flowers on pottery in the manufactory of James Davenport. He came to London in 1819, and for some time supported himself by teaching and by painting flowers, exhibiting flower pieces at the Royal Academy from 1824. It was not till after a visit to Paris in 1831 that he devoted himself to landscape painting, and his works henceforth are a record, brilliant in colours, of his various tours on the continent. He visited Venice, Milan, Geneva, and Paris in 1835; in 1837 he went to Portugal, for the Landscape Annual; in 1845 to Rotterdam; in 1850 to Normandy and North Wales; in 1851 to Geneva; and in 1857 a second time to Venice. Besides the Academy, his works appeared at the Society of Painters in Water-Colours from 1835 to 1843; at the Society of British Artists, of which he was a member, from 1843 to 1848; and afterwards again at the Water-Colour Society, of which he was elected an Associate in 1856, and a full member in 1858, and also at the British Institution. Holland died in London in 1870. Amongst his works are:
London from Blackheath. 1833.
St. Lawrence, Rotterdam; an October morning.
Greenwich Hospital.
The Port of Genoa; moonlight. (Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.)
Interior of Milan Cathedral.
Tomb of the Scaligers, Verona.
St. Mary's Chapel of Warwick.
Six pictures of Venice.
Greenwich Hospital. (Bridgewater Gallery.)

WATER-COLOURS.
La Festa.
Venice; sunset.
The Rialto.
Eighteen Sketches in Portugal. 1837.
Ospedale Civile, Venice.
Near Ramsgate Harbour.
Heath Scene. Bryan's Dictionary of Painters and Engravers, 1876 - Reprinted, 1894, 1899.



Holland, Jamea. (Brit.) (1800-1870.) Settled in London in 1819, beginning his art career as a teacher of flower-painting. First exhibited at the Royal Academy, in 1824, "A Group of Flowers," and contributed similar subjects for some years. He went to France to paint and study in 1830, to Italy in 1835, to Portugal in 1837, and made many excursions through Holland, Normandy, Switzerland, and other Continental states. In 1835 he was elected an Associate of the Water-Color Society, and full Member in 1856. In 1841 he became a member of the Society of British Artists. Among his works are, "A View of London from Black Heath," "Interior of Milan Cathedral," "Rialto, Venice" (Brit. Ins., 1836), "Lisbon" (R. A., 1839), "Greenwich Hospital," "Saint Laurence, Rotterdam, -- an October Morning" (at the International Exhibition of 1862), and "Hinkley Fair" (R. A., 1864).

Artists of the Nineteenth Century & their Works; Biographical Sketches. By Clara Erskine Clement and Laurence Hutton, 1879.

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