Charles Edward Hallé

(1846 - 1914)

Sometimes given as Edward Charles Hallé, was an English painter and gallery manager.

He was a painter of history scenes, genre scenes, and portraits. He was the son of Sir Charles Hallé, the German-born pianist and orchestra conductor, who emigrated to England during the revolution of 1848. His first professors were Richard Doyle and the Carlo Marochetti when he entered the School of the Royal Academy in London. At seventeen years of age he traveled to France and worked with Victor Mottez, a student of Ingres. From France he traveled to Italy. He was attracted to the tradition of Neo-Classicism found in Rome.

Upon his return to London he exhibited four paintings at the Royal Academy in London in 1866, and then departed for Venice. He studied the techniques of the Venetian Masters and tried to paint in their style. He then returned to England and settled permanently in London. In 1877 with J. Comyns Carr, he assisted Lord Coutts Lindsay in the creation of the Grosvenor Gallery. In 1888 with Burne-Jones, he founded the New Gallery in Regent's Street. He exhibited frequently in these two galleries. His works have been displayed in the museum in Sheffield.

Despite having been born only two years prior to the founding the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, stylistically Hallé was firmly aligned with the aesthetic of that group.

Charles Hallé is mentioned very fondly by Isador Duncan in her book titled "My Life' published in 1927, the year of her death. She describes the activities she and Charles enjoyed together in Paris, long strolls, trips to the countryside, gallery tramping and dining. She said, "I danced for him in the forest and he made sketches of me."

Wikipedia

Charles Edward Hallé, a British artist was born 1846 in Paris to English parents and died after 1914. He was a painter of history scenes, genre scenes, and portraits. He was the son of Sir Charles Hallé, a pianist and orchestra conductor who immigrated to England during the revolution of 1848. His first professors were Richard Doyle and the Baron Marochetti when he entered the School of the Royal Academy of London. At seventeen years of age he traveled to France and worked with Victor Mottez, a student of Ingres. From France he traveled to Italy. He was attracted to the tradition of Neo-Classicism found in Rome. Upon his return to London he exhibited four paintings at the Royal Academy of London in 1866 and then departed for Venice. He studied the techniques of the Venetian Masters and tried to paint in their style. He then returned to England and settled permanently in London. In 1877 with Joseph Commyns Carr, he assisted Lord Coutts Lindsay in the creation of the Grosvenor Gallery. In 1888 with Burne-Jones, he founded the New Gallery in Regent's Street. He exhibited frequently in these two galleries. His works have been displayed in the museum in Sheffield.

© Copyright Ownership: European Art Gallery

Hallé helped Sir Coutts Lindsay establish the Grosvenor Gallery in 1877. With its mantra 'Art for Art's sake', the gallery became a flagship for the Aesthetic movement and promoted almost subjectless pictures whose sole raison d'être was to be beautiful.



Hallé was born in Paris, the son of Sir Charles Hallé, the pianist and conductor, and came to England with his parents around the time of the revolution in 1848. His earliest teachers were Richard Doyle (a lifelong friend) and Baron Marochetti. He then entered the Royal Academy schools, and at the age of 16 spent a year in Paris, studying under Ingres's pupil Victor Mottez. When his health broke down he went on to travel in Italy, where he seems to have been particularly responsive to the neo-classical and Nazarene tradition in Rome. In 1867 he spent a year in Venice, a city which he claimed 'captivated me, and laid a spell on me which I have never quite shaken off'. Back in London Hallé met Rossetti and Burne-Jones, and in 1877 he and Joseph Comyns Carr assisted Sir Coutts Lindsay in the founding of the Grosvenor Gallery, to show the work of the more advanced artists of the day. It immeditatly became the flagship of the Aesthetic Movement. When disputes arose over the running of the Grosvenor, Hallé and Carr withdrew and, with the support of Burne-Jones and other luminaries, opened the New Gallery in Regent Street in 1888.

Hallé continued to paint, exhibiting regularly at the Grosvenor and the New Galleries, but he is remembered chiefly for the key part he played in these ventures, with their commitment to innovative art, their ambitious and wide ranging winter exhibitions, and above all their revolutionary approach to display.

The composition ("An Allegorical Figure") picture is strongly reminiscent of Reynolds's Mrs. Siddons as the Tragic Muse, which Hallé would have seen at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. Reynolds's composition in turn ultimately derives from the figure of Isaiah by Michelangelo on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, which Hallé would also have seen on his travels. Working on such a scale, Hallé would undoubtedly have intended the picture to be exhibited, but a precise identification of the subject amongst the many works with Italianate and allegorical themes that he attempted has so far proved elusive.



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