Alfred Downing Fripp

(22 April 1822 - 13 March 1895)



British artist who specialised in watercolours of rural subjects. He was grandson of the artist Nicholas Pocock, a brother of the painter George Arthur Fripp, and father of the surgeon, Sir Alfred Downing Fripp.

Fripp was born in Bristol and studied at the Royal Academy of Arts. He held his first exhibition in 1842, his initial works featuring Irish and Welsh peasants in landscape settings. In 1844, he became an associate of the Old Watercolour Society, progressing to full membership in 1846, and ultimately becoming its secretary from 1870 onward.

Following the death of his first wife in 1850, he spent a decade in Italy, where he became friends with Frederick Leighton and Edward Poynter. On his return in 1859 he continued to paint British subjects, with a particular interest in Dorset scenery around Lulworth. He died, aged 72, in London.

en.Wikipedia

Fripp, Alfred D. (Brit.) Born at Bristol. 1822. Younger brother A. Fripp [George Arthur]. At the age of eighteen he went to London, and studied in the British Museum and in the Royal Academy. Like his brother he has exhibited regularly at the Gallery of the Society of Painters in Water-Colors since 1844, when he sent his "Poacher's Hut." Among his earlier works, generally of British and Irish scenes and character, are, "The Irish Courtship," "The Irish Mother," "Irish Piper," "The Islet Home," and "The Fisherman's Departure." W ntly he has contributed Italian views and mpeii," "An Italian Cottage Door," "Neapolitan Pilgrims," and "Passing the Cross at Ave Maria," in the International Exhibition of 1863, etc.

" 'The Quarry Path,' by Alfred Fripp [Water-Color Exhibition of 1877], for purity of coloring, excellence of perspective, delicacy of touch, and tenderness of outline, is unexcelled in the gallery."' — Art Journal, February, 1877.

Artists of the Nineteenth Century, Work & Biographical Sketches. By Clara Erskine Clement & Laurence Hutton, 1879.


Alfred Downing Fripp, younger brother of George A. Fripp (q-v.), was born in Bristol in 1822. In his early years he was chiefly influenced by W. J. Miiller, and he soon (1840) followed his brother to London where he studied in the sculpture-galleries of the British Museum and at the Royal Academy. Choosing water-colour as a medium he began his career in 1842 by sending three drawings to the British Artists' Gallery. In 1844 he was elected an Associate of the Royal Society of Painters in Water-colour, and thence-forward his reputation steadily grew. In 1846 he became a full member of the Society. He went to Rome in 1850 and remained in Italy till 1859. In 1870 he was appointed Secretary to the Old Society. He visited Ireland thrice, and found there the subjects of some of his most charming works; 'Irish Reapers meeting their Friends after harvesting in England.' He painted many pictures of Italian life and scenery, of which 'Pompeii -— the City of the Dead' (1853), is the most important. "This is one of the few pictures where figures are not the leading motive. On his return he reverted to Welsh and English scenes; figure-subjects with a subordinate but often highly-finished landscape setting. He died in 1895. He contributed to the Gallery about 270 works. Two of his pictures -- 'Young England' and 'The Irish Mother' -- are widely known through engravings. He had a delicate and tender touch, painting rather in low tints, and his drawings show a poetic refinement, a grace and an idyllic simplicity that never fail to charm.

Bryan's dictionary of painters and engravers, 1903

Alfred Downing Fripp

He was an British artist who specialised in watercolours of rural subjects. He was grandson of the artist Nicholas Pocock, a brother of the painter George Arthur Fripp, and father of the surgeon Sir Alfred Downing Fripp. He studied at the Royal Academy of Arts. He held his first exhibition in 1842, his initial works featuring Irish and Welsh peasants in landscape settings. In 1844 he became an associate of the Old Watercolour Society, progressing to full membership in 1846, and ultimately becoming its secretary from 1870 onward. Following the death of his first wife in 1850, he spent a decade in Italy, where he became friends with Frederick Leighton and Edward Poynter. On his return in 1859 he continued to paint British subjects, with a particular interest in Dorset scenery around Lulworth.

Burial: St Mary Church, Tarrant Rushton, Dorset, England



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