The Barrauds

William Barraud. (1810 - 1 Oct 1850)

Henry Barraud. (16 May 1811 - 17 June 1874)

William Barraud, the elder of these two, was born in 1810. From school he was sent direct to an office in the Customs, where his father's interest had procured him an appointment -- the parent of large family feeling doubtless that it was more important to secure for the boy a start in life rather than allow him to depend for a livelihood on the chance of succeeding as an artist. That William Barraud's tastes were artistic from the beginning is obvious, for he occupied his stool in the Custom House only a short time, and left it to study under Abraham Cooper, then an Academician and enjoying the earlier years of his fame as a painter of animals. Under such guidance William Barraud's talents developed very rapidly; in his nineteenth year we find him exhibiting for the first time in the Royal Academy, and perhaps as a direct consequence receiving a commission for the portrait of a dog. This was given him in 1829, by Mr. John Turner, of Clapham Common, a well-known coursing man of the time, who commissioned him to paint the likeness of a favourite greyhound named Triumph. An engraving from this painting, by J. Webb, appeared in vol. 1, xxiii. of the Sporting Magazine. "Triumph" is described as a "red greyhound bitch"; she won the Goblet at Epsom in 1828, and divided the Hedley Stakes with Mr. North's Lancer at Epsom in 1829.

In the following year William Barraud's work attracted the attention of the famous Master of Hounds, Mr. John Warde, known after fifty-seven years of mastership as the "Father of Foxhunters." The approbation of so acute a judge of horse and hound indicates the skill with which the young artist reproduced the character of an animal on his canvas. His first picture for Mr. Warde was a portrait of "Betsy", a favourite foxhound bitch, and the next, painted in the following year, a portrait group comprising "Mr. Warde on Blue Ruin", with Betsy looking up to her master. The picture of Betsy was engraved by J. Webb and reproduced in the Sporting Magazine; a plate by Webb from the second work was published in the New Sporting Magazine.

This portrait group proved a fortunate commission to William Barraud; the likenesses of master, horse, and hound were considered admirable, and the artistic ability exhibited in the handling gained the painter no little reputation. It must be added that he was lucky in his equine subject, for Blue Ruin was known as an extraordinary hunter. Foaled in 1810, Blue Ruin derived his name from the fact that he was bred by a gin distiller at Maidstone; he was three parts bred, being by Mr. Mellish's thoroughbred Didler, by Pegasus, a horse nearly related to the famous Wellesley Arabian, out of a half-bred mare. He stood sixteen hands, and was long a favourite of Mr. Warde, who, as his picture shows, was no ordinary welter weight. On one occasion Blue Ruin was lent to Mr. Asheton Smith, who rode him through an extraordinary run which lasted nearly an hour; not a man of the field could catch them, and the horse still had plenty left in him when hounds pulled down their fox. Mr. Asheton Smith offered Mr. Warde a large sum for Blue Ruin, but the veteran refused to part with him at any price. He was a marvellous stayer, and is said to have done sixty-two miles in a curricle without having the bit removed from his mouth. This horse reached his thirtieth year in Mr. Warde's possession, and at that age was still able to do occasional journeys in harness to London. "The Father of Fox-hunting." a portrait of Mr. Warde. painted by W. Barraud, engraved in large size and printed in colours, was published in 1835, by Rudolph Ackermann.

These works added yet further to the artist's reputation, and his services were sought by many of the leading sportsmen of the day, for whom, often in collaboration with his brother, he painted numerous pictures. HENRY BARRAUD had achieved success as a landscape and portrait painter, and the brothers did so much work together that it is impossible to treat the career of each entirely by itself, One of their more noteworthy joint works was "The Wiltshire Coursing Prize Picture," a large canvas containing forty-six portraits of the leading lights in the turf and coursing-worlds. Among the gentlemen who appear in this picture are Lord Stradbroke, Sir Hesketh Fleetwood, Mr. Bowes, Mr. Harry Briggs, Mr. Bagge, Mr. Etwell, Captain Daintree, Mr. Graham, Squire Goodlake, Mr. Inskipp, Mr. Parkinson, Mr. Bowyer Smith, Mr. Wyndham, and Mr. Nicholson, the flag steward. The group is painted against a landscape background with a view of Stonehenge in the distance. This picture was afterwards engraved and published by the artists themselves.

Other pictures produced by the two brothers were:
"Portrait of Thomas Brand, Esq., and his Huntsman;"
"Portrait of Mr. Davis, Huntsman to Her Majesty, on his favourite mare, with hounds;"
"A Royalist Family taken Prisoners by the Puritans; "
"Waiting for the Laird;"
"The Meet at Crick;"
"The Death of the Hare at Stonehenge;"
"The Last Resource;"
"Androcles and the Lion;"
"The Last Stake;" and
"Border Law."
The last, a Sporting Magazine critic, writing on the Royal Academy pictures of 1838, considered "the best the Barrauds have in the exhibition," being noteworthy for its boldness of conception. The work represented the return of some marauding chieftain with a maiden on his saddle bow; his followers drive before them the "lifted" cattle. "The Fathers of the Pack," also a joint work, was a group comprising portraits of Mr. Richard Hill, his huntsman and the "fathers" of the Pytchley pack of the day, three hounds named Fairplay, Helicon, and Watchman. This work was engraved by Davey and published in 1850. Davey also engraved a plate from another picture painted by the brothers, "A Portrait of Mr. Hill," who was a Master of Hounds in Yorkshire for forty years, and four couples of his hounds. Several of the works enumerated above were exhibited at the Royal Academy, to which, between the years 1829 and 1850, William Barraud sent fifty-seven pictures, inclusive of some in whose production his brother had a part. In 1833, he painted a small portrait subject representing his uncle, Martin Barraud, a well-known sportsman, standing with a greyhound by his side, and a small retriever in the near foreground.

In the volumes of the Sporting Magazine, between the years 1829 and 1861, we find seventeen plates from his pictures, several of which were the work of J. Webb, John Scott, and E. Hacker. Portraits of greyhounds are frequent among these: the picture of Mr. John Turner's "Triumph" has already been mentioned as the artist's first commission. "Tiney", another greyhound, whose portrait was engraved for the magazine, won the Puppy Cup at Epsom in 1827. "Twilight", a blue bitch, and "Wyandotte", a red dog, met in the deciding course for the Wiltshire Coursing-Prize Picture. "Sarah Bate" and "Sedlitz" were noted greyhounds; the former, in 1844, won a Puppy Stake, and in 1845, she beat Captain Daintree's famous "Killena" in a match for 100 guineas at Newmarket. "Sedlitz", in October, 1845, (then named "Fan"), ran up to "Pilgrim" for the Great Champion Puppy Stake at Amesbury; in the following December she won the Champion Puppy Cup at Newmarket; in 1847, she divided the Deptford All-aged Stakes with Mr. Etwall's "Waterfall"; and at Amesbury won the first sixteen-dog stake for the Great Wiltshire Coursing-Picture. 'Midsummer" and "Snowball" belonged to Mr. Henry Miller, of Frome; the former, a red bitch, won a 50l. stake at the Deptford Open Meeting in December, 1847. A good example of William Barraud's skilful handling of animals in motion is his picture of "Winchelsea", a deer belonging to the Surrey Staghounds. Mr. Robinson, the master, bought him with twenty others from Sir Edward Dering, of Surrenden in Kent with whose hounds he had given long runs. "Winchelsea" once went down a deep cutting on the Brighton Railway, near Merstham, and led hounds in full cry through the tunnel. The train from London to Brighton, the deer, and the pack were all in the tunnel together, but quarry and hounds emerged in safety.

In the volumes of the New Sporting Magazine, between 1831 and 1836, are five engravings from William Barraud's pictures, three of them the coursing subjects for which he seems to have had a special liking.

If this artist attained to no conspicuous eminence he was at least a clever draughtsman who has left us good work in his pictures of sport, portraits of sportsmen and famous horses and dogs. He did not confine his brush to sport and kindred subjects; a few of his Royal Academy works betray his taste for classic and historical scenes, while the pictures by which he is probably most widely known are two of a sentimental or pathetic character. The plates which were engraved from these had an enormous sale.

William shared a studio, from 1835, until his untimely death, with his brother Henry, and collaborated on many subject pictures with himself painting the animals and Henry the figures. Several of these joint works were exhibited at the Royal Academy. The brothers also produced a book together entitled Sketches of Figures and Animals (H. Graves and Co. c. 1850). William also collaborated on another book with fellow artist Thomas Fairland (1804–52), called The book of animals drawn from nature (C. Tilt, 1846). In 1841, William married Mary Ratliff and they had a son Clement William (1843–1926), who went on to become a stained-glass designer (for Lavers, Barraud & Westlake), a Jesuit priest, poet and playwright, believed to be living in 1898, at Georgetown in the United States. Mary died soon after the birth and in 1850, William then married Margaret Harrison. William Barraud died in Kensington, London from dysentery and typhoid fever in 1850, at the comparatively early age of 40 years.


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WILLIAM BARRAUD

The family of this artist came over to England from France at the time of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes; his father held a highly responsible situation in the custom-house, and his grandfather was the well-known chronometer maker of Cornhill. His taste for painting was most probably inherited from his maternal grandfather, an excellent miniature painter; but it was not fostered very early in life, for he was, on quitting school, introduced to a situation in the Customs, where, however, he continued but a short time, and then quitted it to follow the profession most in unison with his talents and feelings, under the guidance of Mr. Abraham Cooper, R. A., with whom he studied a considerable time. Without attaining to the highest rank in his peculiar department, that of an animal painter, or rather a painter of horses and dogs, for he chiefly confined his practice to these, he was always correct, and even elegant, in his style of work; while the subject pictures which he painted in conjunction with his brother Henry, are far above mediocrity, both in conception and treatment. The two brothers had long been joint-exhibitors at the Royal Academy and the British Institution. William Barraud died in Oct. 1850, in his 40ih year.

WORKS OF WILLIAM BARRAUD IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM.
-- MARES AND FOALS (water-colour), signed. (William Smith Bequest.)

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY.
1829 -- STUDY OF AN ASS.
1830 -- JOHN TURNER, ESQ., ON "MARQUIS" WITH A BRACE OF GREY HOUNDS.
1831 -- (3)
-- POINTERS.
-- THE COUNCIL OF HORSES.
-- AN OLD HUNTER.
1832 -- (4)
-- AN OLD HACKNEY.
-- A FAVOURITE COB.
-- GULLIVER MEETING.
-- THE HOUYHNHNNMS. (Houyhnhnms are a race of intelligent horses described in the last part of Jonathan Swift's satirical Gulliver's Travels.)
1833 -- (2)
-- SHAKESPEARE, a Hunter.
-- JULIAN PEVERIL COMPELS CHIFFINCH TO RESTORE THE STOLEN PAPERS (vide "Peveril of the Peak.")
1834 -- LORD MARMIONS CHARGER.
1835 -- (3) -- THE SENTINEL.
-- A TERRIER.
-- A FAVOURITE HORSE.
1836 -- (2)
-- RUFUS.
-- PONY AND BOY.
1837 -- FAVOURITES.
1838 -- (3)
-- A FAVOURITE SPANIEL.
-- SCENE IN OTTERSHAW PARK, SURREY, with portraits.
-- TINY.
1839 -- (3)
-- PLATO, property of the Marquess of Hastings.
-- TARTAR, property of Her Majesty.
-- BIJOU.
1840 -- CAPTAIN DALGETTY AND HIS HORSE GUSTAVUS.
1841 -- (3)
-- CATSUP
-- THE POPE'S MULES AT THE FOUNTAIN OF TREVI,
-- PORTRAITS.
1843 -- (2)
-- DEAD FALLOW DEER.
-- HORSES, the property of Sir Geo. Farrant.
1844 -- (3)
-- CONRACH.
-- WAlTING FOR THE FERRY.
-- PORTRAITS.
1845— (2)
-- FAVOURITE HORSES
-- FAVOURITE HORSES.
1846 -- (2)
-- CONRAD, a two-year-old shorthorn bull, bred by Sir Charles Knightley, Bart.
-- TWO FAVOURITE SPANIELS OF LORD METHUEN.
1845 -- (2)
-- FAVOURITE HORSES OF THE MARQUIS OF WORCESTER.
-- SCOTCH TERRIERS.
1849 -- THE GRAYLING, a celebrated Hunter.
1850 -- (2)
-- FAVOURITE PONY AND DOGS.
-- SKYE TERRIERS.
(For pictures painted by William Barraud in collaboration with Henry, see **.)

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (17 in number).
-- TRIUIMPH, greyhound, 1829, vol. 73; engraved by J. Webb. -- TINEY, greyhound.
-- BETSY, foxhound, 1829, vol. 75; both engraved by J. Webb.
-- THE MOORS, 1840, vol. 96; engraved by John Scott.
-- THE TRYSTING PLACE, 1841, vol. 99; engraved by G. Paterson.
-- WINCHELSEA, a famous deer, vol 104.
-- ROBERT BARTLETT, 1st whipper-in to H.M. Buckhounds, 1845, vol. 106; engraved by 0. Paterson.
-- ONCE MORE UPON THE MOONS, 1848, vol. 112; engraved by H. Beckwith.
-- TWILIGHT AND WYANDOTTE, 1845, vol. 112; engraved by J. Scott.
-- DRAFTS FROM THE BADMINTON, 1848, vol. 112; engraved by J. Scott.
-- SARAH BATE AND SEDLITZ, 1849, vol. 114: engraved by E. Hacker.
-- THE NEASDON HARRIERS, 1849, vol. 114; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- BRITISH YEOMAN, a bay horse, winner of the Great Metropolitan Steeplechase, 1849. 1850, vol. 115; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- HERE COME THE HOUNDS, 1850, vol. 115; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- THE COURSER'S COMPANION. Jack, a favourite servant of Henry Miller, with Midsummer and Snowball, 1850, vol. 115; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, 1853, vol. 121; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- A ROUGH LOT, 1861, vol. 138; engraved by E. Hacker.

PLATES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE (5 in number).
-- JOHN WARDE, ESQ., ON HIS FAVOURITE HORSE BLUE RUIN, 1831; engraved by Webb.
-- COURSING, 1832; engraved by Scott.
-- COURSING, 1833; engraved by Englehart.
-- GREYHOUND AND WHELPS, 1834; engraved by Duncan.
-- THE JOCKEY AND HIS HACK, 1836; engraved by Cooke.


HENRY BARRAUD, born in 1811, like his elder brother began life as a clerk in the Custom House after leaving school, and for a short time worked there under his father. Art also claimed him before he had long occupied his stool, and he left the Customs to study under J. J. Middleton, a draughtsman and landscape painter. His bent was more in the direction of landscape and portraiture than towards sport and animal life. It will be remarked that among the pictures which he (from his own easel and not conjointly with William) contributed to the Royal Academy between the years 1833 and 1845, only the first was an animal picture. This was sent in when he was living with his brother at Champion Hill, Camberwell, and is thus described in the catalogue of the 1833 exhibition: -- "Fitzjames Lamenting over his Steed."

"Woe worth the chase, woe worth the day
That cost thy life , my gallant grey."
    ---------- Lady of the Lake, Canto I.

The two brothers shared a studio, and as already said, painted numerous important pictures together: among these, one which attracted great attention and gained for the artists considerable repute, was "The Annual Benediction of the Animals of Rome on the Feast of St. Anthony, by the Pope." This work was exhibited in the year 1842. It seems right to notice this picture among Henry's Royal Academy exhibits rather than those of William, as the works of the former betray a knowledge of Italy which we do not discover in those of the latter; and while it is quite probable that William contributed as much brush-work to the canvas as his brother, the idea of the picture and the general scheme must, for the reason given, be considered Henry's.

The volumes of the Sporting Magazine between 1854 and 1861, contain seven plates from pictures of a sporting character by Henry Barraud -- portraits of horses, hounds and greyhounds. "Wanton", whose picture, engraved by Hacker, was published in vol. 123, was a famous red bitch greyhound bred by Mr. Webb in 1849; of the one and thirty courses in which she was shipped in public she won no fewer than twenty-six. "Hotspur" and "Languish" were a couple of harriers from Sir Humphrey de Trafford's pack.

Among his subject pictures may be mentioned "The Lobby of the House of Commons in 1872," "The London Season" and, more within our scope, "Lord's Cricket Ground." His portrait of "Uxbridge", one of Her Majesty's saddle horses, is in the possession of Mr. F. P. Barraud.

By far the best known of his works was the picture of three choristers entitled, "We praise Thee, O God!" engravings from which have been sold, it is no exaggeration to say, in hundreds of thousands. Few pictures of the devotional class to which this belongs have ever achieved the immense popularity of this unpretentious work by Henry Barraud. It may be added that the legend concerning the fate of the youths whose portraits appear in the picture was floated in a spirit of cynical jest and has no foundation in fact whatever. One of the boys was not hanged, nor were the other two sentenced to penal servitude for life; the three were Henry Barraud's eldest son, his nephew (a son of William), and a friend of theirs; all became respectable members of society. Henry Barraud died in the year 1874, leaving nine children, five boys and four girls. His son Francis Barraud (1856-1924) was also an artist - best remembered for his painting of "Nipper" the dog on the "His Master's Voice" record label. Another son Herbert Rose Barraud (1845-c1896) was a noted portrait photographer.



"Nipper" is famously known as the dog in the “His Master’s Voice”, painted by Francis Barraud. "Nipper" listened to his owner Francis Barraud’s phonograph and ‘appeared curious as to where the sound came from’. "Nipper" sadly died in London in 1895. Some three years after Nipper died, Francis Barraud painted the scene of Nipper listening to the phonograph and called his work “Dog looking at and listening to a Phonograph”. He completed it in 1898.

WORKS OF HENRY BARRAUD EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY.
1833 -- FlTZJAMES LAMENTING OVER HIS STEED.
1834 -- A PORTRAIT.
1835 -- A MOTHER AND CHILD.
1836 -- PORTRAIT OF A LADY IN THE 104th YEAR OF HER AGE.
1837 -- SCENE FROM THE OPERA OF LA GAZZA LADRA.
1840 -- MINSTRELS OF THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY.
1841 -- DOORWAY IN THE CHURCH OF THE SPIRITO SANTO, FLORENCE.
1842 -- ROBERT BRUCE AND THE SPIDER.
1844 -- (2)
-- A BARD
-- THE THEORY OF GRAVITATION, suggested to Sir Isaac Newton by the fall of an apple.
1852 -- MASTER BERESFORD LOWNDES, WITH FAVOURITE PONY AND DOGS.
1853 -- THE TEN VIRGINS.
1855 -- (2)
-- BIRDS OF A FEATHER.
-- THE HOME AT NAZARETH.
1857 -- FETE DIEU.
1858 -- PORTRAITS OF HORSES.
1859 -- THE EARL OF ARUNDEL AND SURREY, WITH FAVOURITE PONY AND DOGS.

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (7 In number).
-- WANTON, a Greyhound, 1854, vol. 123; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- THE KEEP AT ARUNDEL, Three horses, the property of the Duke of Norfolk, 1836, vol. 131; engraved by J. H. Engleheart.
-- HOTSPUR AND LANGUISH, 185S, vol. 132; engraved by W. Backshell.
-- A ROUGH CUSTOMER, a thoroughbred Skye Terrier, 1855, vol. 133; engraved by J. H. Engleheart.
-- POLYDORA, WITH SISTER TO PANDORA AT FOOT, bred by the Duke of Portland in 1837. 1860, vol. 135; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- ANNETTE AND POLYXENA, Brood Mares, the property of Earl Spencer, 1860, vol. 136; engraved by E. Hacker.
-- KEEPER'S COME, SIR, 1861, vol. 137; engraved by E. Hacker.

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**WORKS PAINTED IN COLLABORATION: BY WILLIAM AND HENRY BARRAUD, EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY.

1836 -- (2)
-- THE LAST RESOURCE.
-- THE CHILDREN OF THOS. KEEN, ESQ., WITH THEIR FAVOURITE PONY.
1837 -- THE LAST STAKE.
1838 -- (2)
-- BORDER LAW.
-- ANDROCLES TAKING THE THORN FROM THE LION'S FOOT.
1839 -- THE MISSES ROBARTS ON THEIR FAVOURITE HORSES.
1842 -- THE ANNUAL BENEDICTION OF THE ANIMALS AT ROME ON THE FEAST OF ST. ANTHONY.
1843 -- THE CLAIMS OF ST. FRANCIS.
1844 -- HER MAJESTY'S BEAGLES.
1845 -- A. W. ROBERTS, ESQ.
1846 -- A ROYALIST FAMILY TAKEN PRISONERS BY THE PURITANS.
1847 -- (3)
-- THOMAS BRAND, ESQ., WITH HIS HUNTSMAN.
-- THE EARL OF COVENTRY AND HIS SISTER
-- WAITING FOR THE LAIRD.
1848 -- THE STABLE YARD.
1849 -- MR. DAVIS, HUNTSMAN TO HER MAJESTY, WITH HIS FAVOURITE MARE AND SOME FAVOURITE HOUNDS.

ANIMAL PAINTERS OF ENGLAND, From the Year 1650; A brief history of their lives and works illustrated with twenty-eight specimens of their paintings, chiefly from wood engraviings by F. Babbage. Compiled by Sir Walter Gilby, Bart. Vol I., Vinton & Co., 9 New Bridge Street, Ludgate Circus, E.G., 1900.


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Family History --
About the year 1650, half a century after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, Gabriel Barraud and Madeleine, his wife, came from Normandy to London. What Gabriel Barraud's calling was does not appear, nor does it greatly concern us, it being with his descendants that we have to do. One of these, Paul Philip Barraud, about the middle of the eighteenth century, established himself in Wine Office Court, Fleet Street, as a watch and chronometer maker; and afterwards moving to 41, Cornhill, achieved fame in his own particular line. Paul Philip's son, William Francis, who held an appointment in the Long Room at the Custom House, married and had twelve children, five sons and seven daughters. The two elder sons, William and Henry, became the artists whose works now claim our attention.



View painter's art:


David William Barraud (1810-1850)

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View painter's art: Henry Barraud (1811-1874)

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